ABB FAQ's

Answer:

A Low Harmonic AC Inverter is a drive or drive package that produces less harmonic distortion to the AC line than conventional AC drives.

Answer:

A harmonic is a sinusoidal component of the voltage wave from and is a multiple of the fundamental frequency (60Hz in the US). Non-linear loads such as diode and thyristor rectifiers, other power electronic converters and fluorescent lights cause some distortion of AC line voltage and current. This distortion is called electrical harmonic. High harmonic content may disturb or damage the sensitive electronic equipment connected to the same AC line network.

Answer:

The drive can be "tuned" to the application to achieve maximum output of the equipment. Sometimes this is slightly under the base speed of the motor, and sometimes, it is over the base speed of  he motor. Since every application is different, contact us through an email or the phone to discuss your application in detail and discover how we can help improve your companies' production output.

Answer:

This is one of the best applications for an AC drive. In most fan/pump applications, there is a need to vary the output of the fan/pump. This is very easy to achieve with an AC drive. Plus you get the benefit of reduced energy cost of running the motor!!!

Answer:

No, variable frequency drives are not phase sensitive. You can adjust the direction of rotation of the motor, through the software of the drive.

Answer:

Yes, a variable frequency drive can replace a soft start starter, since most drives give you a current limiting ramp to start and stop your motor. BUT, if you do not need to vary the production speed of your motor, then the soft start starter is still the correct product for the application. This is because the cost of the soft start starter is less than the cost of a variable frequency drive.

Answer:

A variable frequency drive (VFD) refers to AC dives only and a variable speed drive (VSD) refers to either AC Drives or DC Drives. VFD's vary the speed of an AC motor by varying the frequency to the motor. VSD's referring to DC motors vary the speed by varying the voltage to the motor.